Who isn’t responding to the Census in North Carolina?

Every household that doesn’t fill out the census form online, by mail, or by phone—known as “self-response”—enters the Census Bureau’s non-response follow-up (NRFU) universe. During NRFU, the Census Bureau sends trained enumerators door-to-door to collect census responses directly. This is an expensive and time-consuming process. NRFU was supposed to start in May 2020 but has been delayed due to COVID-19. The Census Bureau currently plans to begin NRFU operations in mid-August. To understand which communities this might impact, we examined shifts in the tracts with the lowest self-response (bottom 20%) and compared low response rates on March 20th with the lowest responding tracts as of May 17th. (The bottom 20% is a fluid group. The tracts in the bottom can change week to week as certain communities increase their response rates.)

Continue Reading »

2020 Census: How is North Carolina doing?

NC Census Tracker Updates Visit the NC Census Tracker Sign up for email updates about the map and our weekly response rate analyses Presentations and Downloads 2020 Census: How is North Carolina Doing (April 22, 2020) North Carolina: Census 2020 Real-Time Response Rates – Week ending April 26 (PDF) County-Level Response Rates – Week ending April 26 New: NC college maps and tract data Note: The below analysis was done on 4/22/2020 with the self-response…

Continue Reading »

How many North Carolina households might be eligible for federal stimulus checks?

April 15 would normally mark Tax Day, the federal income filing deadline. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, Tax Day is now extended three months to July 15. Instead, as the U.S. ends its first month of widespread social distancing, many American households may receive their federal stimulus check this week. These stimulus checks – also known as Economic Impact Payments – will be as much as $1,200 per person, but not everyone will qualify. I…

Continue Reading »

Counting farmworkers in the 2020 Census

How many farmworkers are in the United States? There are about 3 million farmworkers in the United States: about two million are family farmworkers and another one million are hired farmworkers. Do hired farmworkers count in the Census? If a farmworker is living in a community on April 1, 2020, and that is their usual residence, meaning that it is the place where they live and sleep most of the time, they should be counted…

Continue Reading »

2020 Census response rates in NC by contact strategy

The coronavirus pandemic has already affected 2020 Census operations in a variety of ways. Earlier this month, the Census Bureau announced that it would delay the start of its field operations – hiring and training workers to go to households – for two weeks, until April 1. This post looks at response rates by type of enumeration area (how the Bureau planned to contact households and invite them to respond to the Census) to understand…

Continue Reading »

How the Census Bureau operational updates will impact North Carolina

2020 Census counting officially began on January 21 with early data collection in remote Alaska and the first wave of mailings went out in early March. By law, the Census Bureau is required to deliver the count used for apportioning seats in the U.S. House of Representatives by December 31, 2020. That means that no matter what, the count must go on. The Bureau is now adjusting to the challenges of counting all Americans in…

Continue Reading »

Today is Census Day: How is North Carolina responding to the Census so far?

When completing the 2020 Census, respondents are asked to report everyone living in their home on April 1, 2020 – this date is known as “Census Day.” What do we know about how the nation and North Carolina are responding? 2020 response rate lags the response in 2010 According to City University of New York’s (CUNY) Center for Urban Research, response to the 2020 Census lags rates observed in 2010. As of March 31, 2010,…

Continue Reading »

New county estimates offer 2020 Census preview

The 2019 county population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau are the last set of population estimate before results of the 2020 Census are released in early 2021. Here’s what they tell us about how counties have changed in North Carolina over the past decade. Growth and Decline Statewide, North Carolina has maintained steady growth since the 2010 Census, but this growth has been uneven across the state: 57 counties have grown since 2010 –…

Continue Reading »

What 8th graders (and others) want to know about the Census

Last year, I wrote that the census “is kind of like the Super Bowl for demographers, if the Super Bowl only took place once a decade.” Over the past few months, Carolina Demography has been ramping up for the 2020 Census. We worked with the NC Counts Coalition to release a hard-to-count map for North Carolina. In addition, we’ve spoken at events across the state about the importance of the Census, how an undercount could…

Continue Reading »

Where are college students counted for the 2020 Census?

Across North Carolina, there are many communities impacted by the presence of a college or university. Where will these students be counted in the 2020 Census: at their school address or at their parents’ home? According to the Census Residence Criteria, students are counted at their “usual residence” or where they live and sleep “most of the time.” This means that college students are counted at their college address, either on or off campus. They should only be counted at their parents’ home if they are living and sleeping there most of the time. The Census Bureau provides detailed information on the Residence Criteria governing college students in section C.10.a-f of the census rules.

Continue Reading »

1 2 3 29