North Carolina’s Economically Distressed Tracts & Neighbors, Pre- and Post-Recession

By on 6.23.14 in Economic Data

Researchers at UNC’s Center for Urban and Regional Studies identified 162 economically distressed tracts in North Carolina based on the 2007-2011 American Community Survey. Each distressed tract met three criteria: Unemployment rate greater than or equal to 14.5% Annual per capita income less than or equal to $16,921 Poverty rate greater than or equal to 24% Statewide, these 162 tracts represent 7.4% of North Carolina’s 2,195 census tracts. An additional 477 census tracts were not…

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NC in Focus: English-Speaking Ability

“English-speaking ability is an important topic surrounding immigration in the United States. For the foreign born, fluency in English is associated with greater earnings and occupational mobility. Conversely, the presence of many people with limited English ability requires state and local governments to make costly adjustments, such as providing English as a Second Language classes in schools and translating official forms into multiple languages.”  - Christine Gambino, Yesenia Acosta, and Elizabeth Grieco, “English-Speaking Ability of…

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Mortality and Cause of Death, 1900 v. 2010

The overall mortality rate in the United States declined markedly over the 20th century, resulting in large gains in life expectancy. In 1900, the average U.S. newborn could expect to live to 47.3 years of age. In 2010, they could expect more than 30 additional years of life, with a life expectancy at birth of 78.7. In 1900, the top 3 causes of death were infectious diseases—pneumonia and flu, tuberculosis, and gastrointestinal infections (a fourth…

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Largest Denomination by County, 1916-1936

While Catholicism and non-denominational churches are gaining adherents within the state, 2010 county patterns of religious affiliation reflect significant stability in North Carolina’s religious landscape. These maps of religious affiliation by county, measured as the denomination with the largest number of adherents according to the United States Census of Religious Bodies for 1916, 1926, and 1936, highlight this stability. As in 2010, Southern Baptist is the largest denominational affiliation statewide, United Methodist has a strong…

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Riding the third wave of immigration

By on 6.9.14 in Migration

North Carolina was largely untouched by the first two waves of immigration to the United States. Between 1840 and 1889, the U.S. received 14.3 million immigrants, the majority from Northern/Western European countries such as Germany, Ireland, and the United Kingdom. Between 1890 and 1919, another 18.2 million arrived, mainly from Southern/Eastern European countries such as Italy, Russia, and Poland. Yet, in 1920, fewer than 10,000 of the nation’s 14.2 million immigrants lived in North Carolina.…

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NC in Focus: Proportion Foreign Born, 1900-2010

By on 6.5.14 in Migration

The size of the U.S. immigrant population—more than 40 million in the 2012 American Community Survey—is the largest it has ever been. But the immigrant share of the total population, just under 13%, is still less than its historic peak in 1910, when 14.8% or more than 1 in 7 individuals were foreign-born. More than 750,000 immigrants lived in North Carolina in 2012, representing 1 of every 13 North Carolinians. Unlike the country as a…

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Religion in North Carolina: Southern Baptists dominate, Catholicism and non-denominational affiliation rising

According to the most recent U.S. Religion Census, conducted in 2010, about half of the U.S. population (49% or nearly 151 million persons) are adherents to some religion. Nationwide, the largest denominational affiliation is Catholicism, with an estimated 59 million adherents. While Protestantism as a group has more than 77 million adherents, it is comprised of dozens of individual denominations. Among these, the Southern Baptist Convention is the second largest religious group in the United…

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NC in Focus: Child Population

Between 2000 and 2010, North Carolina’s child population (ages 0 to 17) increased by almost 318,000 individuals. Unlike growth in the 65 and older population—which grew by more than 265,000 individuals and increased almost everywhere statewide—growth in the child population was uneven across the state. The child population shrank in 30 rural counties. The largest losses were in the eastern counties of Halifax (-2,387), Edgecombe (-1,188), and Martin (-1,098) and the western counties of Cleveland…

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NC in Focus: Vacation Homes

By on 5.22.14 in Housing

Memorial Day marks the beginning of summer rental season for many communities nationwide. In the decennial census, housing units that are classified as vacant for “seasonal, recreational, or occasional use” are typically referred to as “vacation” homes. The Census Bureau notes, “These may be large summer estates on Long Island, time-sharing condos in Fort Lauderdale, or simple fishing cabins in northern Michigan. Analysts often use this category to estimate the number of second homes in…

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What language does your county speak?

In a previous post, I looked at changes in the number and type of non-English languages spoken at home in North Carolina over time. Today, I’m looking at variation in languages spoken across space; that is, how do languages spoken vary across North Carolina counties? At an initial glance, there is little county-to-county variation. The majority of individuals age 5 and over in each county speak only English at home. Of those that speak another…

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