NC in Focus: Older Workers

By on 8.14.14 in Economic Data

“The U.S. workforce has never been older. The share of workers ages 55 and over hit 22.2 percent in July, according to data released last week by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. That’s the highest since record-keeping began in 1948.” – Peter Coy, “American Workers Are Older Than Ever” at Bloomberg Businessweek Although I don’t have data for North Carolina going back to 1948, the Current Population Survey shows similar trends are occurring in North…

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Majority of NC-born adults still live here

By on 8.11.14 in Migration

As I’ve discussed before, North Carolina is an attractive state to both individuals born here and those born elsewhere. The state’s attractiveness stems from a wide range of educational and employment opportunities, coupled with good quality of life and relatively affordable cost-of-living. North Carolina’s high population growth has been fueled by net migration. Net migration statistics are calculated by subtracting the number of individuals moving away from North Carolina (out-migration) from the number of individuals…

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Size of Non-NC Native Population by County

By on 8.7.14 in Migration

To follow up on Monday's post, here's a look at the size of the population born outside of North Carolina by county. In general, these follow total population patterns: Mecklenburg is the most populous county in the state, followed closely by Wake. Similarly, Mecklenburg has the largest population of individuals born outside of North Carolina; Wake has the second largest population of non-native NC residents. In both counties, more than half a million residents were born outside…

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Non-NC Native Population by County

By on 8.4.14 in Migration

One hundred years ago, when North Carolina had a population of about 2.5 million people, more than nine out of 10 residents were native Tar Heels. Today's North Carolina, in contrast, approaches a population of 10 million, with more than 4 million residents born in another state or country. - Ferrel Guillory and Jessica Kennedy, "Voters born elsewhere make up nearly half of N.C. electorate," NC DataNet While 42% of North Carolina residents were born…

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NC in Focus: Agricultural Employment, 1860-2010

By on 7.31.14 in Economic Data

In 1870, just over half of the nation’s laborers were working on farms; in North Carolina, four of every five workers were employed in agriculture. While the share of workers employed in agriculture, forestry, and fishing industries steadily declined, North Carolina had a higher share of workers employed in agriculture than the nation until 1990. Today, the agricultural, forestry, and fishing industries employ fewer than 3% of all workers.

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Stability and Change in North Carolina’s Top 10 Most Populous Counties

In 1910, North Carolina had a population of 2.2 million. Only two cities, Charlotte (34,014) and Wilmington (25,748), had populations surpassing 25,000 persons. Winston-Salem (22,700) was the third largest city in the state followed by Raleigh (19,218), Asheville (18,762), Durham (18,241), and Greensboro (15,895). None of North Carolina’s cities numbered among the 100 largest cities in the United States. Reflecting this highly rural, low density population, less than 3% of the state’s population lived in…

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NC in Focus: Average Hours Worked Per Week

By on 7.24.14 in Economic Data

With respect to average hours worked, North Carolina is...pretty average, at least compared to the United States. In 2013, North Carolina employees worked an average of 34.5 hours per week or 1,794 hours per year. The U.S. average was 34.4 hours per week or 1,788 hours per year. Among the states, North Carolina was 24th for average weekly hours worked. Texas had the highest hours worked (36.3) and Delaware the lowest (32.6). Average hours worked per week…

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Disability in North Carolina

This Saturday, July 26th, marks the 24th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA. The ADA was signed into law by President George H.W. Bush in 1990 and prohibits employers from discriminating against individuals with disabilities. The ADA also mandates accessibility of state and local government services, public accommodations and commercial facilities, transportation, and telecommunications. The purpose of the ADA was to more fully integrate Americans with disabilities into society. In North Carolina,…

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NC in Focus: Economic Activity of Young Adults

By on 7.17.14 in Economic Data

“Young adults ages 20 to 24 are more likely to be neither working nor enrolled in school than their counterparts two decades ago. […] The numbers are worrying because people in their early twenties are at a critical juncture in their lives. The questions they’re tackling—What should I do for a living? Should I get a degree in this or that? How can I land a good first job?—will shape the rest of their lives.…

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North Carolina & Georgia Border Wars

Few counties today have their original configurations. As the non-Indian population grew and spread across the continent, territories and states created new counties and changed those already in existence. The average number of changes in size, shape, or location per American county is between four and five; some counties were changed more than two dozen times. Most boundary changes were alterations of the lines between existing counties, not the results of creating new counties from…

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