Economic Data

Keep up with our latest demographic insights

Metropolitan Area Economic Output, 2017

The United States economy is primarily driven by the economic activity within its metropolitan areas. From 2012 to 2017, 90% of the nation’s annual GDP was contributed by the nation’s 383 metros. This is to be expected, as 86% of the US population lives in a metropolitan statistical area. North Carolina follows a similar trend. In 2017, the state’s overall GDP was approximately $540 billion, and the combined metros totaled $476 billion, or 88%, of…

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Median household income key predictor of internet access

By on 12.14.18 in Economic Data

Yesterday’s post provided topline statistics about internet access in North Carolina. For many readers, this post raised more questions than it answered. Specifically, one reader wanted to know how many individuals had internet access only through their cell phones. Others had more specific questions about the relationship between income, geography, and access. These questions are addressable with the data and are the focus of this post. How many of the people with internet access are…

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NC in Focus: 2017 Veteran Snapshot

By on 11.8.18 in Economic Data

Just over 656,000 veterans lived in North Carolina in 2017 according to the most recent American Community Survey estimates. This is a decrease of 10,000 veterans from 2016, a decline of 1.5 percent. Nationally, the veteran population decreased at a similar rate, declining from 18.5 million in 2016 to 18.2 million in 2017, a loss of 292,000 on veterans. While the veteran population has been steadily declining, the total adult population continues to grow. As…

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NC in Focus: College Student Impact on Local Poverty Rates

By on 12.7.17 in Economic Data

Colleges and universities can have a significant impact on local demographic and economic statistics. College towns tend to see inflated poverty rates: more off-campus students (as share of population) corresponds to higher poverty rates. In Boone, North Carolina, for example, off-campus students at Appalachian State University make up 57% of the local population* and the local poverty rate is 62%. Some of these poor individuals may be college students who are choosing not to work…

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NC in Focus: Turkeys in North Carolina, 2017

By on 11.21.17 in Economic Data

Turkey production is important to the farming sector of North Carolina. In fact, total poultry production – including turkeys, eggs and broiler chickens – is North Carolina’s top agricultural industry, making up 40% of the state’s farm income. Data from the USDA on “turkey disappearance” per capita in the United States indicated a slight uptick from about 16 pounds annually from 2012-2015 to over 16.5 pounds in 2016 and 2017 (projected). As poultry consumption increases…

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NC in Focus: Sweet Potatoes, 2017

North Carolina’s agricultural industry contributes $84 billion to the state’s economy and employs more than 1 in 6 North Carolina Workers, according to the Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services. Two of the state’s lead agricultural products—sweet potatoes and turkeys—will grace many Thanksgiving tables on Thursday. Here’s a quick look at sweet potatoes by the numbers: 1st North Carolina’s rank in sweet potato production. North Carolina has led the nation in sweet potato production since…

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NC in Focus: Hispanic Employment & Business Ownership

By on 10.17.17 in Economic Data

Series note: This post and the others in this series are the outgrowth of a presentation jointly developed with Dr. Krista M. Perreira and presented by Dr. Perreira to the October meeting of the North Carolina Governor’s Hispanic/Latino Advisory Board. Terminology note: The U.S. Census Bureau introduced the term Hispanic in 1980 and this is a term preferred by some Hispanic/Latino populations. The term Latino became more commonly used in the 1990s and is preferred…

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Future Work(ers)

By on 9.7.16 in Economic Data

“How can we prepare today to create enough good jobs for tomorrow?” was the question posed by NC State’s Institute for Emerging Issues during their summer FutureWork Prosperity Tour. This tour—and the preceding FutureWork conference—focused on the combined impacts of anticipated technological change and demographic shifts. Today’s post highlights some of the projected impacts of demographic change on the state’s workforce. Projected employment growth will exceed working age population growth. Between 2012 and 2022, North…

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NC in Focus: New Data on Entrepreneurship

By on 9.2.16 in Economic Data

Nationally, 22.2% of businesses with paid employees had been operating for no more than three years as of 2014. In North Carolina, this proportion is slightly lower: 20.8% or just over 32,000 of the state’s 154,000 firms were younger businesses, according to recently released data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s first Annual Survey of Entrepreneurs. In contrast, North Carolina had an above average proportion of long-established businesses: 6% of North Carolina businesses with paid employees…

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NC in Focus: Who Works at Home?

By on 3.31.16 in Economic Data

A growing number of North Carolinians are working at home. Since 2012, more than 200,000 North Carolina workers have reported working at home each year, about 4.7% of all state workers according to the American Community Survey data. Are teleworkers similar to individuals who don’t work at home? An examination of the last three years of ACS data—2012 through 2014—suggests they are not. Compared to all North Carolina workers, individuals who report working from home…

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