Keep up with our latest demographic insights

One reason for an increasingly diverse young population? Population aging.

In his recent article about diversity in young Americans, William Frey points to “a noteworthy demographic dynamic [that] is making the young post-millennial generation more racially diverse – the absolute decline in the number of white children (persons under age 18).” This, too, is happening in North Carolina. In 2015, North Carolina had 57,000 fewer white children than in 2010, with the declines most pronounced at ages 10 and under. These declines may be partly…

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Growing 65+ population accounts for majority of population growth in North Carolina, nation

The oldest Baby Boomers began turning 65 on January 1, 2011. Every day since then, about 10,000 Baby Boomers have turned 65. This will continue through the end of 2029. Less than five years into this process, U.S. Census Bureau population estimates for July 1, 2015 already reveal significant impacts of the Boomer’s population aging. In 2010, just under 13% of North Carolina’s population was 65 or older. Five years later, in 2015, this proportion…

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Population Loss & Shifting Age Composition, 2015-2035

Between 2015 and 2035, North Carolina’s Office of State Budget and Management projects that the state will gain nearly 2.1 million new residents. Nearly 41% of this population growth is predicted to occur in either Mecklenburg or Wake counties. Meanwhile, 24 of the state’s counties are projected to lose population over the next 20 years and another nine—Avery, Beaufort, Columbus, Gates, Greene, Rockingham, Rowan, Surry, and Tyrrell counties—are projected to have zero population growth. Bertie…

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Age and Racial/Ethnic Composition, 2014

“Millennials, or America’s youth born between 1982 and 2000, now number 83.1 million and represent more than one quarter of the nation’s population. Their size exceeds that of the 75.4 million baby boomers, according to new U.S. Census Bureau estimates released today. Overall, millennials are more diverse than the generations that preceded them, with 44.2 percent being part of a minority race or ethnic group (that is, a group other than non-Hispanic, single-race white).” –…

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Generational Composition of North Carolina Electorate in 2016

Yesterday’s post examined projected generational changes in North Carolina’s adult population. By 2016, North Carolina is projected to have 7.85 million adults, with the following projected generational breakdown: Greatest ( - 1927): 82,800 Silent (1928-1945): 849,400 Baby Boomers (1946-1964): 2,329,500 Gen X (1965-1981): 2,273,700 Millennial (1982-2004): 2,317,000 Baby Boomers will just barely be the largest adult generation, with Millennials poised to overtake them in population size in 2017. Voting Eligible How do these total population…

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North Carolina’s Generational Composition, 2010-2035

“How Millennial Are You?” asked a 2010 quiz from the Pew Research Center. We hear a lot about generations and generational difference, on topics ranging from grocery shopping to television viewing habits to the future of the suburbs. Many of these conversations center on Millennials and Baby Boomers for two reasons. Not only are these the two largest generations alive, they are currently at key points in their lives. The oldest of the Baby Boomers…

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NC in Focus: Population Proportion 65 and Older, 2010-2035

“In 2011, the first of the baby boomers reached what used to be known as retirement age. And for the next 18 years, boomers will be turning 65 at a rate of about 8,000 a day. As this unique cohort grows older, it will likely transform the institutions of aging — just as it has done to other aspects of American life. Will boomers redefine this life stage, or will it redefine them? We’ll explore that question in…

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