Keep up with our latest demographic insights

Potential voters are fastest-growing segment of NC Hispanic population

North Carolina’s Hispanic or Latino population increased by nearly 116,000 resident between 2012 and 2017, an increase of 13.8% in just five years. The adult population grew faster than the child population over this period. And for both Latino adults and children, growth was due entirely to an increase in the citizen population. The non-citizen population of Latino children and adults decreased by 23.1% and 10.4%, respectively, between 2012 and 2017. As a result of…

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The 2020 census, citizenship, and potential impacts on NC

Once every 10 years, we count all individuals living in the United States in the census. In 2010, respondents were asked ten questions about basic characteristics, such as age, sex, race, and homeownership status. Last week, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced that census respondents will answer one additional question in 2020: citizenship status. Introducing an additional, untested question so late in the census life cycle is concerning to demographers and social scientists, like me, who rely on the census as a key source of information about how and why our population is changing.

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North Carolina Hispanics and the Electorate

Monday, September 15th, through Wednesday, October 15th, marks National Hispanic Heritage Month. In 2012, the Pew Research Hispanic Trends Project published a look at the Hispanic electorate in every state. They noted that, in North Carolina: The number of Latinos registered to vote has increased tenfold since 2004. It rose from 10,000 during the 2004 presidential election to 68,000 during the 2008 presidential election and now stands at 113,000. The share of Latino registered voters…

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Riding the third wave of immigration

By on 6.9.14 in Migration

North Carolina was largely untouched by the first two waves of immigration to the United States. Between 1840 and 1889, the U.S. received 14.3 million immigrants, the majority from Northern/Western European countries such as Germany, Ireland, and the United Kingdom. Between 1890 and 1919, another 18.2 million arrived, mainly from Southern/Eastern European countries such as Italy, Russia, and Poland. Yet, in 1920, fewer than 10,000 of the nation’s 14.2 million immigrants lived in North Carolina.…

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