Keep up with our latest demographic insights

Over half a million eligible voters have lived in NC for less than 5 years

In March 2015, there were 7.1 million eligible voters (citizens 18+) living in the state according to estimates from the Current Population Survey. Of these, 557,000 or 8% moved to North Carolina between 2010 and 2015. This post provides a brief profile of these new to North Carolina potential voters. Origin The largest share moved from Florida (88K), representing 16% of all eligible voters new to North Carolina since 2010. Another 67,000 or 12% moved…

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NC in Focus: Why people didn’t vote in 2014

Not all North Carolinians who are eligible to vote (citizens 18+) are registered to vote, and only two-thirds of those who were registered to vote participated in the 2014 election. Overall, less than half of North Carolina’s eligible voters cast a ballot in November 2014 according to the Current Population Survey voter supplement. Why didn’t individuals vote? Just over one in four registered voters (26%) reported that they did not vote because they were too…

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Racial & Ethnic Differences in Registration & Voting, 2014

According to the 2014 Current Population Survey, nearly 70% of North Carolina citizens 18 and older were registered to vote in the November 2014 election. Only about two-thirds of registered voters reported actually voting on Election Day, however, meaning less than half (46.2%) of eligible voters voted in 2014. Among North Carolina adults, there are significant racial and ethnic differences in eligibility to vote, registration rates, and voter turnout. As a consequence, the composition of…

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NC in Focus: Marital Status of Unmarried Adults, 2014

Nearly 3.2 million North Carolina adults (18+) were unmarried in 2014, representing 3% of the 107 million unmarried adults nationwide. In both the United States and North Carolina, never married individuals comprise the majority of unmarried adults—63%. Nationwide, a higher share of unmarried adults report being divorced (24%) than in North Carolina (21%). In North Carolina, it is more common for unmarried adults to be widowed (17% vs. 13% nationwide).Among unmarried adults, there are significant…

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Unmarried Adults by State

“The Buckeye Singles Council started “National Singles Week” in Ohio in the 1980s to celebrate single life and recognize singles and their contributions to society. The week is now widely observed during the third full week of September (Sept. 20-26 in 2015) as “Unmarried and Single Americans Week,” an acknowledgment that many unmarried Americans do not identify with the word “single” because they are parents, have partners or are widowed.” – U.S. Census Bureau Nationwide,…

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NC in Focus: Percent and Number of Movers

By on 4.2.15 in Migration

“When the Current Population Survey started collecting migration information in 1948, about one-in-five people moved over a one-year period. Today, that number has fallen to about one in nine.” – David Ihrke, U.S. Census Bureau Moving is a common experience. The average American will move about 12 times in their lifetime. Most of these moves are clustered in young adulthood, as individuals move to go to school, start jobs, and form families. In North Carolina,…

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Housing and family drive 1.2 million in-state moves

By on 2.3.14 in Migration

In both this blog and recent presentations, I’ve talked a lot about migration, as net migration into North Carolina is a major factor in state total population growth. But this is only one aspect of movement and migration. Each year, many more people move within the state than move into it. In the 2012 American Community Survey, nearly 1.5 million North Carolina residents reported moving in the past year. Of these movers, the vast majority…

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Why do people move to North Carolina?

By on 1.28.14 in Migration

For more than twenty years, migration has fueled North Carolina’s growth. People move from other states and countries to go to school, to work, and to retire throughout the state. Between 1990 and 2010, North Carolina gained more than 2 million new residents due to migration. New Census Bureau estimates for July 1, 2013 total population show that migration continues to drive North Carolina’s population growth: 175,000 people moved into the state since 2010, accounting…

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