Keep up with our latest demographic insights

Non-Native North Carolina Residents, 2012-2016

The percentage of the state’s total population not born in North Carolina continues to rise. Recent estimates from the American Community Survey indicate that 43% of the overall population is non-native, up 1 percentage point from previous five-year estimates when this share was 42%. This share is even higher among the adult population. Nearly half of all individuals 18 and older were born somewhere else and this group has grown faster than the population overall.…

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NC in Focus: Who are NC’s Democratic voters?

As of October 1st, North Carolina had 5.6 million active, registered voters. Of these, 2.2 million or 40% were registered as a Democrat. Age Older voters are the most likely to register as a Democrat, partly reflecting the legacy of the “Solid South.” Nearly 1 in 2 voters ages 75 and older—48%—are registered Democrats compared to 35% of 18-34 year-olds, 37% of 35-54 year-olds, and 43% of voters ages 55-74. As a result, older adults…

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NC in Focus: Who are NC’s Republican voters?

As of October 1st, North Carolina had 5.6 million active, registered voters. Of these, 1.8 million or 31% were registered as Republican. Age Younger voters are the least likely to register as Republican, reflecting their higher affinity for registering unaffiliated. Just 25% of voters ages 18-34 are registered Republican compared to 32% of 35-54 year-olds, 34% of 55-74 year-olds, and 35% of voters ages 75 and older. As a result, older adults, especially those ages…

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NC in Focus: Who are NC’s unaffiliated voters?

As of October 1st, North Carolina had 5.6 million active, registered voters. Of these, 1.6 million or 29% were registered as unaffiliated. Age Younger voters are more likely to register as unaffiliated: 39% of voters ages 18-34 are unaffiliated compared to 30% of 35-54 year-olds, 23% of 55-74 year-olds, and 17% of voters ages 75 and older. The median age of unaffiliated voters is just 43 compared to 52 for voters registered with a party.…

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NC in Focus: Where were NC voters born?

With the majority of North Carolina's population growth since 1990 fueled by net in-migration, the share of residents born in other states and countries has steadily increased. According to the State Board of Elections, over 6.6 million North Carolinians were registered to vote as of September 3rd, 2016. Where were they born? In the 9/3/2016 data, 85% of voters provided information on place of birth. Half of the voters who reported their birthplace were born in North…

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Not from around here: Share of population born in state of residence

By on 6.2.16 in Migration

Nationwide, 58.7% of U.S. residents currently live in the same state they were born in, according to 2010-2014 American Community Survey data. This ranges from a high of 78% in Louisiana to a low of 25% in Nevada. North Carolina is similar to the national average: 57.8% of North Carolina state residents were born here. Among North Carolina’s counties, the proportion NC-native ranges from less than 1 in 3 residents in both Currituck (25.5%) and…

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NC in Focus: North Carolina-born Hispanics

Monday, September 15th, through Wednesday, October 15th, marks National Hispanic Heritage Month. North Carolina’s Hispanic population grew from fewer than 77,000 residents in 1990 to nearly 867,000 in 2013. Between 1990 and 2010, the majority of population growth was due to net migration. As a consequence, the most common birthplace for North Carolina Hispanics was Mexico. In 2000, nearly half (47.4%) of North Carolina’s Hispanic residents were Mexican-born. As the Hispanic population settled in the state,…

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North Carolina’s Hispanic Population: Social Characteristics

Monday, September 15th, through Wednesday, October 15th, marks National Hispanic Heritage Month. In 2012, there were 845,420 Hispanics living in the state, nearly 9% of the state’s total population. In yesterday’s post, I looked at some of the components of this population’s growth. Today, I’ll look at some social characteristics. Place of Birth Just over half (53%) of North Carolina Hispanics were born in the United States or a U.S. territory; 47% were foreign-born. Examining the…

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